Broad-leaved Wild-quince

Taxonomy
Scientific Name
Cryptocarya latifolia Sond.
Higher Classification
Dicotyledons
Family
LAURACEAE
Common Names
Bastard Stinkwood (e), Baster-stinkhout (a), Basterswartstinkhout (a), Basterswartysterhout (a), Breëblaarkweper (a), Breëblaar-kweper (a), Broad-leaved Laurel (e), Broad-leaved Quince (e), Broad-leaved Wild-quince (e), Pondo-kweper (a), Umdlangwenya (z), Umgxaleba (x), Umgxobothi (x), Umhlangwenya (z), Umkhondweni (z), Umncatyana (x), Umthongwa (x), Umthongwane (x), Umthungwa (z), Umthungwa (x), Wild Quince (e), Wildekweper (a)
National Status
Status and Criteria
Least Concern
Assessment Date
2016/06/28
Assessor(s)
V.L. Williams, D. Raimondo, N.R. Crouch, A.B. Cunningham, C.R. Scott-Shaw, M. Lötter & A.M. Ngwenya
Justification
Population decline over the last three generations (120 years) estimated to be ± 20%, due to bark harvesting and habitat destruction. The decline is expected to continue. However, the species is considered to be resilient and survives in some degraded water courses, and population reduction is not expected to exceed 30% in three generations.
Distribution
Endemism
South African endemic
Provincial distribution
Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal
Range
Port St Johns to Zululand.
Habitat and Ecology
Major system
Terrestrial
Major habitats
Forest
Description
Evergreen forests along streams and rivers, coastal forests and coastal plateaus.
Threats
Bark used for traditional medicine and is sold in the Durban and Johannesburg medicinal plant markets (V.L. Williams, pers. comm., 2008). The species is often used interchangeably with Cryptocarya myrtifolia and C. woodii. Cunningham (1988) classed as it 'declining' in KwaZulu-Natal because wild populations were being destroyed by harvesters. It was also estimated that 228 bags (50kg-size) of Cryptocarya spp. (C. latifolia and C. myrtifolia) were being sold annually by 54 herb-traders in the Durban region. Williams (2007) found that 62% of Witwatersrand muthi shops in 1994 and 2% of the Faraday market street traders in 2001 sold Cryptocarya spp. Destructive bark harvesting has been witnessed in various KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape forests (N.R. Crouch and R. Scott-Shaw, pers. comm., 2008) Because Cryptocarya spp. contains various aromatic compounds, it is has become a recent substitute for the now-scarce Ocotea bullata. Hence, ± latifolia exploitation is a current consequence of the past exploitation of O. bullata (N.R. Crouch, pers. comm., 2008). It was estimated by participants at the Red List workshop (Durban, January 2008), that population decline in many of the forests over the last 120 years has been <20% (assuming a generation length of 40 years). However, at least 20% of the forests no longer exist due to habitat destruction and the loss of sub-populations will certainly continue in the Transkei region of the Eastern Cape in the future. However, the species' ability to survive in degraded water courses mitigates its assessment as NT or VU. It is also considered "difficult to get rid of", and it shows good coppicing ability.
Population
Population trend
Decreasing
Assessment History
Taxon assessed
Status and Criteria
Citation/Red List version
Cryptocarya latifolia Sond.Declining Raimondo et al. (2009)
Bibliography

Boon, R. 2010. Pooley's Trees of eastern South Africa. Flora and Fauna Publications Trust, Durban.


Cunningham, A.B. 1988. An investigation of the herbal medicine trade in Natal/KwaZulu. Investigational Report No. 29. Institute of Natural Resources, Pietermaritzburg.


Palmer, E. and Pitman, N. 1972. Trees of southern Africa covering all known indigenous species in the Republic of South Africa, South-West Africa, Botswana, Lesotho and Swaziland. Volume 2. A.A.Balkema, Cape Town.


Raimondo, D., von Staden, L., Foden, W., Victor, J.E., Helme, N.A., Turner, R.C., Kamundi, D.A. and Manyama, P.A. 2009. Red List of South African Plants. Strelitzia 25. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria.


Williams, V.L. 2007. The design of a risk assessment model to determine the impact of the herbal medicine trade on the Witwatersrand on resources of indigenous plant species. Unpublished PhD Thesis, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.


Citation
Williams, V.L., Raimondo, D., Crouch, N.R., Cunningham, A.B., Scott-Shaw, C.R., Lötter, M. & Ngwenya, A.M. 2016. Cryptocarya latifolia Sond. National Assessment: Red List of South African Plants version 2017.1. Accessed on 2019/03/21

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Distribution map

© H.F. Glen

© H.F. Glen

© H.F. Glen

© H.F. Glen

© H.F. Glen

© H.F. Glen

© H.F. Glen


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