Venda Brides-bush

Taxonomy
Scientific Name
Pavetta tshikondeni N.Hahn
Higher Classification
Dicotyledons
Family
RUBIACEAE
Common Names
Venda Brides-bush (e)
National Status
Status and Criteria
Least Concern
Assessment Date
2018/10/01
Assessor(s)
L. von Staden
Justification
Pavetta tshikondeni is a rare, range-restricted species with an extent of occurrence (EOO) of 962 km². It is not threatened, and is therefore listed as Least Concern.
Distribution
Endemism
South African endemic
Provincial distribution
Limpopo
Range
This species is endemic to South Africa, and is found near the Luvuvhu and Mutale Rivers in the vicinity of Punda Maria, northern Kruger National Park.
Habitat and Ecology
Major system
Terrestrial
Major habitats
Cathedral Mopane Bushveld, Limpopo Ridge Bushveld, Musina Mopane Bushveld, Subtropical Alluvial Vegetation
Description
It occurs in rocky areas, often on steep slopes, in Androstachys woodland.
Threats
There are no severe threats to Pavetta tshikondeni.
Population

There is no information available on the population of this species.


Population trend
Stable
Conservation
It is conserved in the Kruger National Park.
Assessment History
Taxon assessed
Status and Criteria
Citation/Red List version
Pavetta tshikondeni N.HahnLC 2020.1
Pavetta tshikondeni N.HahnRare Raimondo et al. (2009)
Bibliography

Hahn, N. 1999. Rubiaceae: A new species of Pavetta from the Soutpansberg, South Africa. Bothalia 29(1):107-109.


Hahn, N. 2002. Endemic flora of the Soutpansberg. Unpublished MSc, Univeristy of Natal, Pietermaritzburg.


Raimondo, D., von Staden, L., Foden, W., Victor, J.E., Helme, N.A., Turner, R.C., Kamundi, D.A. and Manyama, P.A. 2009. Red List of South African Plants. Strelitzia 25. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria.


Citation
von Staden, L. 2018. Pavetta tshikondeni N.Hahn. National Assessment: Red List of South African Plants version . Accessed on 2024/06/14

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Distribution map


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