Dune Aloe

Taxonomy
Scientific Name
Aloe thraskii Baker
Higher Classification
Monocotyledons
Family
ASPHODELACEAE
Common Names
Dune Aloe (e), Ikhala (x), Strand Aloe (e), Strand-aalwyn (a), Umhlaba (z)
National Status
Status and Criteria
Near Threatened A2c
Assessment Date
2007/05/15
Assessor(s)
C.R. Scott-Shaw, B. Church & L. von Staden
Justification
Experts estimate that 20-30% of the habitat has been lost to urban and coastal development in the last three generations (generation length 20 years), decline is continuing as a result of habitat loss and illegal collecting for the specialist succulent horticultural trade.
Distribution
Endemism
South African endemic
Provincial distribution
Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal
Range
aMatikulu to Port St Johns.
Habitat and Ecology
Major system
Terrestrial
Major habitats
Indian Ocean Coastal Belt
Description
Dense coastal bush on dunes from the beach margin to a few hundred metres inland, but no further than the top of the first sea-facing slope.
Threats
The main threat to this species is transformation and degradation of coastal dunes by coastal development (C.R. Scott-Shaw pers. comm.) Although the vegetation type to which this species is endemic, Dune Thicket, has been classified as Least Threatened by the NSBA (Rouget et al. 2004), an "unknown percentage of this vegetation type has been transformed by urban sprawl" according to Mucina and Rutherford (2006) and this was not included in Rouget et al.'s calculations. There are also indications that Subtropical Dune Thicket has been inadequately mapped and it is therefore very difficult to calculate the percentage of habitat that has been lost. As a result expert estimates have been used to predict levels of decline. Rob Scott-Shaw believes that although some habitat has been lost, this species is still relatively common along most of its range, and he would estimate that between 20 and 30% has been lost, but not more than 30% (pers. comm. 2007). Additional threats include removal of plants for horticultural purposes this species grows in highly accessible, densely populated areas, and it is quite likely that many plants are removed (B. Church pers. comm.). Due to the degradation and transformation of the coast many dune systems have become very fragile, and subsequently they are more easily damaged by severe storms as experienced during 2007, when a number of populations were impacted (B. Church pers. comm.). Severe storms are also likely to become more frequent with climate change, and may impact more severely on dune systems in the future.
Population
Population trend
Decreasing
Assessment History
Taxon assessed
Status and Criteria
Citation/Red List version
Aloe thraskii BakerNT A2cRaimondo et al. (2009)
Aloe thraskii BakerLower Risk - Near Threatened Scott-Shaw (1999)
Bibliography

Boon, R. 2010. Pooley's Trees of eastern South Africa. Flora and Fauna Publications Trust, Durban.


Germishuizen, G., Meyer, N.L., Steenkamp, Y. and Keith, M. (eds). 2006. A checklist of South African plants. Southern African Botanical Diversity Network Report 41 SABONET, Pretoria.


Glen, H.F. and Hardy, D.S. 2000. Aloaceae (First part): Aloe. In: G. Germishuizen (ed). Flora of Southern Africa 5 Part 1, Fascicle 1:1-159. National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.


Mucina, L. and Rutherford, M.C. (eds). 2006. The vegetation of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland. Strelitzia 19. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria.


Raimondo, D., von Staden, L., Foden, W., Victor, J.E., Helme, N.A., Turner, R.C., Kamundi, D.A. and Manyama, P.A. 2009. Red List of South African Plants. Strelitzia 25. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria.


Reynolds, G.W. 1969. The Aloes of South Africa. A.A. Balkema, Cape Town.


Rouget, M., Reyers, B., Jonas, Z., Desmet, P., Driver, A., Maze, K., Egoh, B. and Cowling, R.M. 2004. South African National Spatial Biodiversity Assessment 2004: Technical Report. Volume 1: Terrestrial component. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria.


Scott-Shaw, C.R. 1999. Rare and threatened plants of KwaZulu-Natal and neighbouring regions. KwaZulu-Natal Nature Conservation Service, Pietermaritzburg.


Van Wyk, B.-E. and Smith, G. 1996. Guide to the aloes of South Africa. Briza Publications, Pretoria.


Citation
Scott-Shaw, C.R., Church, B. & von Staden, L. 2007. Aloe thraskii Baker. National Assessment: Red List of South African Plants version 2017.1. Accessed on 2018/11/18

Comment on this assessment Comment on this assessment
Distribution map

© P. Nel

© C. Wahlberg

© C. Wahlberg

© C. Wahlberg

© C. Wahlberg

© C. Wahlberg

© C. Wahlberg

© C. Wahlberg

© C. Wahlberg

© C. Wahlberg

© C. Wahlberg

© H.F. Glen


Search for images of Aloe thraskii on iSpot