Zulu False-thorn

Taxonomy
Scientific Name
Albizia suluensis Gerstner
Higher Classification
Dicotyledons
Family
FABACEAE
Common Names
Ingwebu-enkulu (z), Ungwebo-omkulu (z), Unyazangoma (z), Zulu Albizia (e), Zulu False-thorn (e), Zulu-valsdoring (a)
National Status
Status and Criteria
Endangered B1ab(ii,iii,v)+2ab(ii,iii,v); C2a(ii)
Assessment Date
2014/08/06
Assessor(s)
C.R. Scott-Shaw, J.E. Victor, L. von Staden & A.E. van Wyk
Justification
Trees occur as one large continuous subpopulation (EOO is 330-400 km²), but there are two locations: the portion of the subpopulation that is protected inside the Hluhluwe Game Reserve, and the trees in forest patches outside the reserve, that are all impacted on by harvesting for firewood, building materials and medicine. Population estimated to be 1 000-2 500 mature individuals and is declining.
Distribution
Endemism
South African endemic
Provincial distribution
KwaZulu-Natal
Range
Hlabisa to Hluhluwe.
Habitat and Ecology
Major system
Terrestrial
Major habitats
Scarp Forest, Zululand Lowveld
Description
Scarp forest, riverine thicket and open woodland, often along streams, usually along the upper altitudinal perimeter and on steep slopes.
Threats
This species occurs in a densely populated rural area, where dependence on natural resources is high. Trees are harvested outside the Hluhluwe-Umfolozi Game Reserve for firewood and building materials, and the forests are also being cleared for subsistence farming (C.R. Scott-Shaw pers. comm.). According to Gerstner (1947), the bark is harvested for medicinal use. Much of the area is also heavily infested with Chromolaena, an alien invasive plant, which spreads most rapidly in response to disturbance.
Population

All the trees in the various forest patches are considered to be a single subpopulation, as these areas are interconnected and gene flow by means of pollination and seed dispersal is possible. There are two locations: the portion of the population that is protected inside the reserve, and the trees in forest patches outside the reserve, that are all impacted on by harvesting for firewood, building materials and medicine. (C.R. Scott-Shaw pers. comm. 2007). The remaining population is estimated to number between 1000 and 2500 mature individuals, and severe declines have been observed through monitoring.


Population trend
Decreasing
Conservation
Hluhluwe-Umfolozi Game Reserve.
Assessment History
Taxon assessed
Status and Criteria
Citation/Red List version
Albizia suluensis GerstnerEN B1ab(ii,iii,v)+2ab(ii,iii,v); C2a(ii)Raimondo et al. (2009)
Albizia suluensis GerstnerVU A1c, B1B2abcde, C1C2a, D1D2Scott-Shaw (1999)
Albizia suluensis GerstnerVulnerable Hilton-Taylor (1996)
Albizia suluensis GerstnerRare Hall et al. (1980)
Bibliography

Boon, R. 2010. Pooley's Trees of eastern South Africa. Flora and Fauna Publications Trust, Durban.


Gerstner, J. 1947. Albizia suluensis. Journal of South African Botany 13:62-64.


Hall, A.V., De Winter, M., De Winter, B. and Van Oosterhout, S.A.M. 1980. Threatened plants of southern Africa. South African National Scienctific Programmes Report 45. CSIR, Pretoria.


Hilton-Taylor, C. 1996. Red data list of southern African plants. Strelitzia 4. South African National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.


Raimondo, D., von Staden, L., Foden, W., Victor, J.E., Helme, N.A., Turner, R.C., Kamundi, D.A. and Manyama, P.A. 2009. Red List of South African Plants. Strelitzia 25. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria.


Scott-Shaw, C.R. 1999. Rare and threatened plants of KwaZulu-Natal and neighbouring regions. KwaZulu-Natal Nature Conservation Service, Pietermaritzburg.


Citation
Scott-Shaw, C.R., Victor, J.E., von Staden, L. & van Wyk, A.E. 2014. Albizia suluensis Gerstner. National Assessment: Red List of South African Plants version 2017.1. Accessed on 2017/11/20

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Distribution map

© F. Du Randt

© F. Du Randt

© G. Nichols

© G. Nichols

© H.F. Glen

© H.F. Glen

© H.F. Glen


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