Large-nut Sugarbush

Taxonomy
Scientific Name
Protea inopina Rourke
Higher Classification
Dicotyledons
Family
PROTEACEAE
Common Names
Large-nut Sugarbush (e)
National Status
Status and Criteria
Vulnerable A2c; D2
Assessment Date
2019/09/30
Assessor(s)
A.G. Rebelo, H. Mtshali & L. von Staden
Justification
A population reduction of 28-36% is estimated based on habitat loss due to agriculture in past 150 years (generation length 50 years). The extent of occurrence (EOO) is 2 km², and an area of occupancy (AOO) is 16 km², there is a continuing decline of habitat, but population reduction is unlikely to exceed 30% within the next generation (50 years) as this species occurs on rocky slopes that are unlikely to be impacted by agriculture. The one known location is potentially threatened by pathogens and expanding agriculture. Severe scale infections have been observed in the population, which consists of 162-9485 mature individuals.
Distribution
Endemism
South African endemic
Provincial distribution
Western Cape
Range
Southern Olifants River Mountains near Paleisheuwel.
Habitat and Ecology
Major system
Terrestrial
Major habitats
Cederberg Sandstone Fynbos
Description
This species occurs in sandstone fynbos on rocky slopes, at 550-800 m. It is a long-lived species, and survives fires by resprouting from underground boles or rootstocks. Wind-dispersed seeds are stored in fire-resistant inflorescences, and released after fires. It is pollinated by birds.
Threats
The central portion of the species occurrence has been ploughed up, but this is not typical habitat, the species preferring rocky slopes rather than deep soils. The species is a resprouter and survives fire well, not exhibiting any marked fire-related population fluctuations. No observations of drought-related mortality have been received.
Population

This is a very local species, known from a single locality extending over 3 km on the Olifants River Mountains at Pretoriuskrans. The species is a resprouter and survives fire well, not exhibiting any marked fire-related population fluctuations. No observations of drought-related mortality have been received. It is not found in any protected areas.


Population trend
Stable
Assessment History
Taxon assessed
Status and Criteria
Citation/Red List version
Protea inopina RourkeVU D1+2Raimondo et al. (2009)
Protea inopina RourkeRare Hilton-Taylor (1996)
Bibliography

Goldblatt, P. and Manning, J.C. 2000. Cape Plants: A conspectus of the Cape Flora of South Africa. Strelitzia 9. National Botanical Institute, Cape Town.


Hilton-Taylor, C. 1996. Red data list of southern African plants. Strelitzia 4. South African National Botanical Institute, Pretoria.


Raimondo, D., von Staden, L., Foden, W., Victor, J.E., Helme, N.A., Turner, R.C., Kamundi, D.A. and Manyama, P.A. 2009. Red List of South African Plants. Strelitzia 25. South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria.


Rebelo, T. 2001. Sasol Proteas: A field guide to the proteas of southern Africa. (2nd ed.). Fernwood Press, Vlaeberg, Cape Town.


Citation
Rebelo, A.G., Mtshali, H. & von Staden, L. 2019. Protea inopina Rourke. National Assessment: Red List of South African Plants version 2020.1. Accessed on 2021/12/02

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Distribution map


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